Ancient tradition

Cow Creek development would threaten a way of life | My opinion

When I learned of the proposal to develop 1,100 acres around the Cow Creek Pastoral Ranch in San Miguel County, I couldn’t help but draw comparisons between those plans and the fictional story depicted in Milagro Beanfield’s War – a film I made 30 years ago. Milagro tells the story of a cultural clash between a small community closely tied …

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Sculptures by Artist Joel Isaak Celebrate the Lives of Indigenous Fishermen | Alaska Native Quarterly

Pick up your copy of the summer issue of Alaska Native Quarterly from places you’ll find Anchorage Press, or sign up HERE for home delivery. A family committed to the centuries-old tradition of salmon fishing and farming will soon welcome residents of the Yukon-Kuskokwim region as they enter the expanded Bethel Hospital. Artist Dena’ina Joel Isaak created the life-size statues …

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Have you ever seen Chichén Itzá? Meet its former sister city of Mayapán

Mayapán, considered the last important capital of the ancient Mayans, is ideal for visitors who prefer less crowded archaeological areas. Mayapán is believed to mean “Banner of the Mayans” or “Flag of the Mayas”. The site, about 40 kilometers from Mérida, Yucatán, in the municipality of Tecoh, was inhabited between 300 BC and 600 AD, but the walled city is …

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Was a vicious Cosmic Airbust behind the Sodom story?

(News) – The biblical city of Sodom was destroyed by “brimstone and fire”, as the book of Genesis says. Now, scientists say it’s possible that this story is the written version of the oral tradition of what happened to an ancient Middle Eastern city now called Tall el-Hammam, which they determined was erased by a space rock about 3,600 years …

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6 book recommendations from Monica Byrne

Monica Byrne is a novelist, playwright and screenwriter. His ambitious new work of speculative fiction, The real star, follows three characters reincarnated through two millennia, from the collapse of the ancient Mayan civilization to a distant utopia. God is not one by Stephen Prothero (2010). I couldn’t let go of this book. It’s a lucid comparison of the eight great …

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Members of the lost Bnei Menashe tribe celebrate Sukkot in northeast India

(September 20, 2021 / JNS) Like many Jews around the world, members of the Bnei Menashe community in India are gathering to celebrate Sukkot this week. In their festival prayers, they made a special appeal to realize their age-old dream of making alyah over the coming year. “Even in the most remote areas of northeast India, the Bnei Menashe continued …

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Saudi hospitality: Jubbah a city without doors

The Jubbah Oasis in northern Saudi Arabia, where humans lived during periods of increased rainfall hundreds of thousands of years ago. Image Credit: Courtesy: Projet Paléodéserts Abu Dhabi: Like the Indian village of Shani Chingnapur in Maharashtra which has caught the world’s attention because all of its houses are without locks and doors, the Saudi Arabian town of Jubbah in …

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Luxury is home made this heritage month

September is a month of celebration in South Africa. We go back to the roots, we come together and we celebrate what makes us the epitome of South Africa. South Africa’s heritage is deeply rooted in its distinctiveness. While it is rare for a country to have both a diverse cultural and natural heritage, we find ourselves blessed with both; …

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The island with an ancient history that explains the world

In July 1997, I had the chance to spend a few days among the Paiwan, an aboriginal people of the highlands of south central Taiwan. I was in the country for generally academic reasons, attending a conference at a research center in Taipei, but had been invited by a few anthropology students who were undertaking fieldwork in the interior of …

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In Afghanistan, girls are forced to dress like boys

AREF KARIMI / Getty Society tells us, even as young girls, that boys have an easier time. But basically here in America boys and girls have equal access to education, work, and sports (mostly). We may not all have equity, but many of us have access to it, and that means something. For boys and girls in Afghanistan, life is …

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Faith must identify with those who suffer, says the Pope at mass

ŠAŠTIN, Slovakia – The world needs Christians who are “signs of contradiction,” who demonstrate the beauty of the gospel rather than hostility towards others, said Pope Francis. Celebrating Mass on the last day of his apostolic trip to Slovakia on September 15, the Pope said the country needs such prophets who are “models of fraternal life, where society experiences tensions …

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Taliban and Afghan women in sport: La Tribune India

Rohit mahajan SHOULD WE allow women to play sports? Is it necessary for women to play sports? In the civilized world, anyone who uses the words “allow” and “necessary” in the context of women in sport – or any other field of human endeavor – would be considered an idiot who is not suitable to be taken seriously. But not …

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The ancient roots of Greek hospitality

The Story of Baucis and Philemon – a pair of former Hospitallers who were saved by Zeus and Hermes. Credit: Wikipedia / Public domain. The Greek word Philoxenia, literally translated as “the friend of a stranger”, is widely seen as synonymous with hospitality. For the Greeks, it is much deeper than that. It is an unspoken cultural law which shows …

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The strange race to find a billion years gone

“On these timescales, we’re not really good at fine-tuning an age for the exact missing time,” says Francis Macdonald, professor of geology at the University of California at Santa Barbara, who was also involved in the research. “And so the previous theory suggested that okay, it all forms once, with glaciation – but we say ‘no, it formed over hundreds …

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Seven books (none of them by Khaled Hosseini)

As the Taliban stormed into major cities in Afghanistan to regain political control after the US withdrawal, citizens and residents feared the return of hard-line Islamic rule. Although the Taliban have promised more moderate rule – and respect for women’s rights – most are skeptical and wonder what the future holds for them, especially women who fear losing the basic …

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AMU students condemn VC for condolences on death of Kalyan Singh

An unsavory controversy has erupted at Aligarh Muslim University with university students criticizing Vice-Chancellor Professor Tariq Mansoor for mourning the death of the former UP chief minister Kalyan Singh and posted a message of condolence. Hateful posters were put up on the university campus by the students condemning the rector for an “act” which they described as “shameful and hurtful …

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Quads: the heart of the campus

Quads are the heart of the campus, a central gathering space usually anchored in the main buildings of an institution. They also contribute a great deal to the character and identity of a campus and a university. Usually shaped like rectangles, anything can happen in well-maintained areas, usually located in the center of campus. Students, staff and faculty can meet …

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Opinions of our readers 23 August 2021

Taliban make clear their intentions While reports of 150 Indians intercepted on their way to the airport by the Taliban triggered fear and anxiety are indisputable, it has revealed the truth that not only the moderate Taliban are a ‘smokescreen’, but also far. In fact, interrogation of the abducted Indians made it clear that Indians are no longer wanted there …

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Cork legend Ben O’Connor believes rebels can dethrone Limerick

Conversation with Ben O’Connor who sometimes looks like Cork. Yes, the three-time winner All-Ireland believes Cork has more than a chance to defeat the All-Ireland champions and put a dent in their aura of invincibility, recalling another team in another code. He draws that parallel with a smile, but in a week in which Cork appears in three All-Ireland finals …

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David Bouchier: a gift from the past

Few things are so deeply rooted in human nature as the idea of ​​property. One of the first words a child learns is “mine”. Our whole civilization is based on the right to own and own property. 18th century philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau argued that property is the source of all our inequalities, conflicts and wars. A garden fence or …

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Fasting May Have Become a Health Fad, But Religious Communities Have Been Doing It For Millennia | Religion

The practice of fasting has entered popular culture in recent years as a way to shed extra pounds. Featured in the bestselling book “The Fast Diet”, he advocates eating normally on certain days of the week while drastically reducing calories on the remaining days. Fasting has been shown to improve metabolism, prevent or slow disease, and possibly increase lifespan. But …

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Tokyo 2020 Olympic venues combine tradition and future

Tradition and modernity are never far away in Tokyo, the Japanese capital, where ryokas, teahouses and ancient shrines rub shoulders with glass skyscrapers, capsule hotels and robot cafes. Northampton, MA –News Direct– International Olympic Committee Tradition and modernity are never far away in Tokyo, the Japanese capital, where ryokas, teahouses and ancient shrines rub shoulders with glass skyscrapers, capsule hotels …

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Can Welsh handball bounce back after extinction?

“Will it be difficult to find, you think? asks my friend Ben Coakley as he leads us through the hills of South Wales. The answer, we will soon find out, is no. Half an hour north of Cardiff, we can easily see our destination: an imposing concrete structure towering over a central location in the village of Nelson. Over 150 …

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‘Karen, Queen of Congee’ opposes branding of ancient Asian dish for Western palate

A breakfast brand that “upgrades” the congee for the Western palate sparked controversy over the weekend after Twitter users accused it of cultural appropriation. Company context: Founded in 2017 in Eugene, Oregon, Breakfast Cure sells packets of various flavors of “congee” that focus on “organic whole grains, gluten free and a wide variety of ingredients”. He calls each of his …

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A “submerged city” discovered off the coast of Egypt

(Reuters) – Divers have discovered rare remains of a military ship in the ancient sunken city of Thônis-Heracleion – once Egypt’s largest port on the Mediterranean – and a burial complex illustrating the presence of Greek merchants, the country said on Monday 19 July. The city, which controlled entry into Egypt at the mouth of a western arm of the …

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Egypt finds ancient military ship and Greek tombs in sunken city

CAIRO, July 19 (Reuters) – Divers have discovered the rare remains of a military ship in the ancient sunken city of Thônis-Heracleion – once Egypt’s largest port on the Mediterranean – and a burial complex illustrating the presence of Greek merchants, the country reported on Monday. The city, which controlled entry into Egypt at the mouth of a western arm …

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India is not just arranged marriage and curdled rice

While arranged marriages continue to find favor with many, the nature of them has changed in many ways today. The topic of social media discussion this week was the Emmy-nominated web series “Indian Matchmaking” in the Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program category. Indian Twitter got dizzy that a reality show about Indian arranged marriages could actually get an Emmy! While Indo-American …

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These pretty Italian villages want to pay you $ 33,000 to move in

Bova enjoys a fascinating view of the coast. Italian villages will pay people to move to sleepy villages in the hope of reversing years of population decline. (Carmine Verduci) CALABRIA, ITALY – Have you always dreamed of opening a craft store and settling for good in an idyllic village in southern Italy where it is hot most of the year …

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How to get rid of the dead? This controversy and many others figure in this history of the Parsis

The differences between BPP [Bombay Parsi Panchayat] administrators, between reformists and conservatives, have led to inappropriate bickering over the past decades. One of the main sources of contention was the operation of the Towers of Silence at Doongerwadi. According to the Vendidad, Zoroastrianism has a unique system of eliminating the dead – dokhmenishini – because cremation pollutes the fire, which …

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‘One Last Monster’ Roots Giant Monsters In Korean History

One of the most striking visuals of Gene Kim’s animated short One last monster currently touring festivals, is the giant turtle tanks. The kingdom of Adin is led to war by huge stocky chelonians with cannons mounted on their backs. They are a formidable tusk, extremely cute and rooted in one of the favorite tales of Korean history. Kim told …

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art exhibition pays homage to Abrahamic history in early Dubai |

DUBAI – The second largest city in the United Arab Emirates, Dubai, welcomes the Abrahamic family: JOE MACHINE, a captivating collection of contemporary paintings by famous British artist Joe Machine, as part of the artist’s debut in Dubai and the Arab Emirates United. On display July 1 through August 14 at the new Masterpiece Fine Art, Dubai Gallery, are the …

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The unsolved mystery of Skeleton Lake

The rising sun was not yet shining on the icy and snowy cirque where I rested after a morning walk towards a glacial tarn. Cold and miserable, at a dizzying height of 4,800m in the Indian Himalayas, I couldn’t muster the energy to take care of the pile of human skeletons piled up beside the frozen lake known as Roopkund. …

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The idea of ​​exporting democracy is undemocratic: Oxford professor

TEHRAN – A professor of history at the University of Oxford says the idea of ​​exporting democracy as a technique or technology is undemocratic. “The American idea of ​​democracy as an export element is not only undemocratic, but a product of neoliberalism,” Faisal Devji told The Tehran Times. Devji also says, “Democracy here has been redesigned as a repeatable technique …

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Revisiting the children of Macaulay

Many years ago I wrote an essay for the magazine called “The Children of Macaulay”. Thirty-five years later, I’m pleasantly surprised to still think essentially the same way. The main ideas of this essay were the need for roots, the English educational system that made us Brown Sahibs, the alluring appeal of the English literature I teach, and the need …

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The 4th of July parade: an ivory tradition

By Rita Christopher / Zip06.com • 06/29/2021 1:20 PM EST If it’s July 4th, there must be a parade down Main Street in Ivorton. At least for 14 years, there have been. This year marks the 15th year of the march. The parade will depart at 10 a.m. and will descend Main Street from Ivoryton to Ivoryton Green on Sunday …

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The Ultimate Guide to Mexican BBQ 2021

Kirt Edblom / Flickr The richness of Mexican cuisine is unmatched. In northern Mexico, beef dishes reign supreme due to a rich history of cattle ranching. In the southern peninsula state of Yucatan, seafood is a way of life. In bustling, bustling Mexico City, diners enjoy tacos al pastor on the busy streets. Because of this culinary diversity, it’s no …

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Buenos Aires Hours | Embassy of India leads International Yoga Day celebrations

The Indian Embassy in Argentina hosted a series of celebrations and commemorative events last week to mark International Yoga Day (June 21), raising awareness of the benefits of the ancient practice both offline and online. line. The main celebration took place last Sunday, with an event featuring art, music and dance performances broadcast live from the Indian Embassy. There was …

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The team resurrecting ancient Rome’s favorite condiment

On a sunny day at In May, a dozen people gathered in the Roman ruins of Troia, in present-day Portugal, with a recipe. The list of ingredients? 400 kilos of sardines, 150 kilos of sea salt and 350 liters of sea water. The group included archaeologists, nutritionists, palynologists, ichthyologists and, of course, a qualified chef. They had come together to …

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Just the beginning – The Sopris Sun

Para leer in español, presiona aquí. By Vanessa Porras This Friday, June 25, the “Identidad y Libertad” exhibition will end at the R2 gallery of the Launchpad. For those who were able to attend the opening of the exhibition, two of the artists, Tony Ortega and Armando Silva, were present and gave a brief introduction to their work and the …

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“Make every day a day of yoga”

International Yoga Day was celebrated on Monday by members of the Odia Society UAE in Dubai. Also this year, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), including Odias, participated in this occasion with total enthusiasm in programs with limited attendance, parks and houses while respecting the restriction. Regular yoga practice can dramatically transform our lives by boosting our immunity, self-esteem, and self-confidence. …

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KP Sharma Oli is wrong again and says “yoga originated in Nepal, not India”

International oi-Deepika S | Updated: Tuesday June 22, 2021, 2:21 PM [IST] Kathmandu, June 22: In another controversial statement, the Acting Prime Minister of Nepal, KP Sharma Oli, claimed that yoga originated in Nepal and not India. KP Sharma Oli “Yoga originated in Nepal, not India. When yoga first came into being, India did not exist; it was divided into …

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Why collard greens are important to the black culinary tradition

Photo: Saundi Wilson (Getty Images) welcome to Flavor & Soul: A Brief History of African American Cuisine. We’ll take a closer look at a dish each week and trace its roots in African-American culinary tradition. For every significant celebration throughout the African American Diaspora, there will be greens. It doesn’t matter if it’s Christmas, graduation or June 17th, if that …

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